How We’re Using Gravity Forms and Zapier to Automate Customer Off-boarding

When a customer leaves us, we like to set them (and us) up for future success. For example, when a customer leaves us I fill out a single form that automates many of the tasks noted below:

  1. We add a note and update their tags in our CRM. [AUTOMATED BY ZAPIER]
  2. We mail them a postcard via Handwrytten with a $5 Starbucks gift card (a little special “goodbye” from us). [AUTOMATED BY ZAPIER]
  3. We send them an email notifying them that the service has stopped. [AUTOMATED BY GRAVITY FORMS]
  4. We send our Slack channel a notification letting our internal team know that the customer has left us. [AUTOMATED BY GRAVITY FORMS]
  5. We update their Mailchimp lists/tags/etc. [COULD BE AUTOMATED BY GRAVITY FORMS]
  6. We update our “current customers and their services” Google spreadsheets. (one for admin and one for our support team) [COULD BE AUTOMATED BY GRAVITY FORMS]
  7. If requested, we’ll zip up their WordPress site and share with them. [COULD BE AUTOMATED BY GRAVITY FORMS]
  8. We delete recurring invoices in our payment system(s).
  9. We disconnect Jetpack, VaultPress, Gravity Forms, etc. if they are using our connections to those services.
  10. We delete their account from our hosting servers (if applicable).

In summary, 7 of 10 customer off-boarding steps could be automated, which is pretty cool. We only do 4 of those, because I’m a cheapskate and don’t want to pay the $20/mo for the fancy version of Zapier. 🙂

Toby Cryns

RSS From Toby’s Blog

  • The Horrors of Covering Your Own Ass
    Today I emailed a very simple question to support@[companyname].com (2 sentences total). The automated response I got back was this: Keep in mind that the above was an auto-response and: It’s hard to read. Everything has the same import (e.g. none of it is important enough to call out separately). It’s long. It added absolutely-zero…
  • If something stupid makes money, then it’s not stupid.
    I’ve seen some stupid things in my life…And some of them were really really smart. I remember a story from decades ago where the U.S. military was looking to equip the Stealth Bomber with a fancy computer-driven video system so the pilots could see behind them. Well, the computers failed to get the job done,…
  • There is no destination.
    Coding is a process of failure followed by a moment of great joy. You've gotta ride through the failures to experience the joy...

More posts from themightymo.com

How I Optimized My Website Today

By The Mighty Mo! Design Co. | July 24, 2021

Today I decided to invest 1 hour optimizing themightymo.com. Below are the actions I took along with the results. Speed Benchmarks and Initial Observations Before starting on today’s speed optimization, Google Pagespeed Insights scored us as a “44”. There’s some files loading from the wp.com cdn (e.g. Jetpack’s cdn) – Google is penalizing me for…

How to give 2 IAM users web access to an S3 bucket

By The Mighty Mo! Design Co. | May 25, 2021

Here’s a quick tutorial about how to give 2 IAM users web access to an S3 bucket.

Where to go for website design inspiration

By Toby Cryns | May 5, 2021

I asked a design group I’m part of where they go for website design inspiration, and here are their recommendations

RSS From Toby’s Blog

  • The Horrors of Covering Your Own Ass
    Today I emailed a very simple question to support@[companyname].com (2 sentences total). The automated response I got back was this: Keep in mind that the above was an auto-response and: It’s hard to read. Everything has the same import (e.g. none of it is important enough to call out separately). It’s long. It added absolutely-zero…
  • If something stupid makes money, then it’s not stupid.
    I’ve seen some stupid things in my life…And some of them were really really smart. I remember a story from decades ago where the U.S. military was looking to equip the Stealth Bomber with a fancy computer-driven video system so the pilots could see behind them. Well, the computers failed to get the job done,…
  • There is no destination.
    Coding is a process of failure followed by a moment of great joy. You've gotta ride through the failures to experience the joy...